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The Way Things Were By Anne Weaver

Wednesday, May 29, 2013 - Updated: 5:44 PM

ABOUT THE WEEK OF MAY 29, 1964, resort owners of the Central Adirondacks would receive their first real taste of summer business the coming weekend. The holiday fell on Saturday, but many plants and industries in nearby Utica, Rome, Syracuse and Rochester were closing down Thursday night, making it a three-day holiday. (In 1968 Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which moved four holidays, including Memorial Day, from their traditional dates to a specified Monday to create a convenient three-day weekend. The change moved Memorial Day from its traditional May 30 date to the last Monday in May.  --Wikipedia).

With good warm weather, local businessmen and promoters predicted one of the biggest Memorial Day weekends in several years. Numerous restaurants, taverns, hotels and motels would open this weekend for the season.

The Enchanted Forest, one of the biggest tourist attractions in the Central Adirondacks, would also begin operation this weekend and would have Baron Damone, Syracuse TV movie host, as a guest to greet the youngsters Saturday and Sunday.

Camp-owners were expected to converge on the area by the thousands to enjoy the extra days' vacation. Highway traffic was expected to flow smoothly through the mountains with the Old Forge - McKeever road now in perfect condition and only a slight delay on the new section of road between Inlet and Eagle Bay.

Provided the weather was nice, beaches, lakefronts and the lakes themselves would be in for a busy weekend. The previous Saturday and Sunday, with temperatures in the 70s and 80s, early season swimmers and water skiers were out in full force.

Old Forge and Inlet golf courses had also been busy the past several weeks and they, too, were expected to attract hundreds to these parts over the weekend.

Some 600,000 New York state operator licenses, roughly one-quarter of the first punch card licenses issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles during the first year the system went into effect, were due to expire June 30.

A second 600,000 would expire Aug. 30 and a third Dec. 31 under the plan of staggered expiration dates. An early return to the nearest issuing office of the DMV, or a county clerk, of the filled-out application, the fee and the renewal stub from the current license was suggested.

Drivers were being encouraged to attach a new "Adirondack" booster plate to the empty license plate spot on their cars' front bumpers, to not only spruce up the appearance of their cars but to help everyone in the Adirondack Park at the same time. Booster plates were available at The Adirondack Echo office at $2 each. Help support the Adirondack Park wherever you go.

William Rutherford, Paul Smith's, had been appointed State Masonic District Deputy Grand Master of Fulton-Hamilton District, it was announced by the newly elected Grand Master of the 300,000 Masons of New York State, Supreme Court Justice Clarence J. Henry of Rochester. He succeeded Morrison J. Hosley of Long Lake and would serve for one year.

New York's tenting season was about to burst into full swing with the recent announcement that the Conservation Department's 45 campsites in the Catskills and Adirondacks would be open with a caretaker on duty by May 27, 1964. The charge for a camping permit had been increased from $1.25 to $1.50 per night to standardize the campsite fees with rates established in the various Park Regions throughout the state.

The charge for day use privileges including picnicking, swimming, boating and fishing remained unchanged at 50 cents per car.

Campsites open in Hamilton County were: Brown's Tract Pond and 8th Lake, Inlet; Forked Lake, Long Lake; Golden Beach, Arietta; Indian Lake Islands, Lake Pleasant; Lake Durant, Indian Lake; Lake Eaton, Long Lake; Lewey Lake, Lake Pleasant; Limekiln Lake, Inlet; Little Sand Point, Arietta; Moffitt's Beach, Lake Pleasant; Point Comfort and Poplar Point, Arietta; and Sacandaga, Wells.

At HAMILTON COUNTY, an elaborate program had been arranged by American Legion Leonard-Mick-Roberts Post 1402 in Inlet, where the annual county parade would be held. Five school bands would participate in the festivities, including the Town of Webb School Band from adjoining Herkimer County.

The program, complete with a souvenir Memorial Day booklet, was in the charge of Commander Bernard Ross, who would also act as master of ceremonies. The program would include the Invocation by the Very Rev. Francis Edie, OFM, Conv., pastor of St. Anthony's Church; the national anthem "The Star-Spangled Banner" by the Town of Webb School Band; welcome address by Supervisor Norton Bird; Introduction of Post Commander by Peter Kalil; Band Selection by Wells School Band; Introduction of County Commander by Joe Potter; Introduction of County American Legion Auxiliary President by Virginia Morrison; Band Selection by Indian Lake School Band; Address by Guest Speaker Dr. Herrick Connors; Band Selection by Long Lake Band; Memorial Day Prayer by the Rev. Donald Milnes; Leonard-Mick-Roberts Legion Post Firing Squad; "Taps;" and Benediction by the Rev. Livingston Bentley.

Dr. Herrick Conners, guest speaker, was the immediate Past State Commander of the American Legion and a delegate to the National Convention of the American Legion. Dr. Connor was superintendent of schools of Cohoes School System.

At INLET, Gaiety Theatre had announced the following movies: "Lawrence of Arabia," winner of seven Academy Awards including Best Picture of the Year; "Rampage" with Robert Mitchum, Elsa Martinelli and Jack Hawkins; and "Sabu, the Elephant Boy."

     

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