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Thursday, November 27, 2014
Speculator, NY ,
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The Way Things Were By Anne Weaver

Wednesday, September 25, 2013 - Updated: 11:39 AM

ABOUT THE WEEK OF SEPT. 25, 1964, the Motor Vehicle Department suggested that drivers check the expiration date of their New York state operator's licenses, for some 600,000 of them had to be renewed by the end of the month. Drivers who were among this group should have received a punch card renewal application by now through the mail, but some may have gone astray and have been misplaced after receipt.

For some renewal applicants, those whose last initials began with "A" through "F," a test of vision was required. The visual examination could be accomplished in two ways. The driver could take it at the issuing office, free of charge, or have it administered by his own physician, oculist, ophthalmologist or optometrist.

The hunting season schedule for Hamilton County, which was included in Area B of the four-party permit, was as follows: Oct. 25 - Dec. 1 with quota of 5,500. For the Northern Zone gunning season was from Oct. 25 - Dec. 1; special archery season from Oct. 11-24.

In 1962, New York state led the nation in maple syrup production with 524,000 gallons.

At HAMILTON COUNTY, Republican Committee Chairman Earl C. Farber, Dalwin J. Niles, Republican candidate for state senator, and Glenn Harris, Hamilton County's own Republican candidate for Member of Assembly, had been campaigning throughout the county.

All fire sirens in Hamilton County would be rung by the county two-way radio system each Saturday noon until further notice.

State Comptroller Arthur Levitt had announced the distribution of monies for state aid in education. Hamilton County received $81,921.

A panel of 24 persons to serve as grand jurors during a session of Hamilton County Court in the county Courthouse in the hamlet of Lake Pleasant were appointed. They were: Dorothy Reese, housewife, Lake Pleasant; Emmett King, manager, Blue Mt. Lake; Danford Bradt, laborer, Wells; Douglas Doyle, laborer, Long Lake; Edith Schoonmaker, housewife, Speculator; Frank Benton, trucker, Indian Lake; Winnie Elsworth, laborer, Northville; Edgar Lanphear, laborer, Raquette Lake; James Meneilly Jr., laborer, Inlet; Arnold Brusso, laborer, Lake Pleasant; Hilda Craig, clerk, Wells; Don E. Burch, laborer, Long Lake; Henrietta Perkins, hotel owner, Speculator; Floyd Knowlton, laborer, Wells; Joseph Schwartz, motel, Inlet; Mildred McDonald, Indian Lake; Bernard Lanphear, laborer, Indian Lake; George Flynn, liquor store, Speculator; Edwin K. Wilson, laborer, Long Lake; Helen Helms, housewife, Long Lake; Otto Trappe, laborer, Sabael; Almedia Dunham, housewife, Lake Pleasant; Jessie Remonda, housewife, Hoffmeister.

At INLET, Brian C. Gribneau, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clayton A. Gribneau, Inlet, who had been spending a week's vacation at home, left for Bolivia with 40 other Peace Corps community development workers. These volunteers would supplement the efforts of over 100 volunteers currently working in Bolivia in health, university education, agriculture and community development programs.

The rough jungle frontier region of the Alto Beni, where the new volunteers would work, had great promise of prosperity if human and natural resources could be developed. Towards this end, the Bolivian government had requested Peace Corps assistance in carrying out village improvement projects.

Volunteers would perform such tasks as teaching, road construction, building houses and schools, growing demonstration gardens, establishing potable water sources and improving health and home economics. The volunteers attended an 11-week training session at the University of Oklahoma and then gained three weeks of practical field experience.

Central Adirondacks residents shed their coats, sweaters and jackets as temperatures rose into the low 80s. A bright afternoon sun illuminated mountainsides, showing off the brilliant colors of the fall foliage. Although the entire week had been warm and sunny, Wednesday was as nice a summer's day as any experienced in July or August.

Clovis LeBraun, 40, an experienced woodsman, spent a night in the woods after being reported missing in the woods near Honnedaga Lake. LeBraun, who was painting a boundary line on the Adirondack League Club property, was to meet other members of the line crew but failed to do so. State police were called at 10 p.m. The search party disbanded at 2 a.m. and LeBraun came out of the woods after.

The high spot in the fall foliage season had about reached its peak. Brilliant reds, oranges and greens could be seen on nearly every mountainside in the Adirondacks. The color was expected to remain for a week or two.

A representative of the Social Security Administration's Utica office would visit Old Forge Post Office, District Manager Raymond L. Schultz had announced. He would be at the post office to answer questions and take applications for Social Security benefits. Schultz urged anybody in the Old Forge area who had questions regarding Social Security to visit the representative.

Gaiety Theatre announced the following movie: Alfred Hitchcock's "Marnie" with Tippi Hedron and Sean Connery.

At LONG LAKE, all persons were warned against hunting, fishing, berry-picking, fruit-picking or trespassing for these purposes, or any other unlawful purpose, on that tract of land located on the north side of the Long Lake-Newcomb highway, owned by Finch, Pruyn & Co. and leased by the Kempsall Mountain Club Inc. under penalty of the law.

     

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