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IL wants SAFE Act reviewed

Wednesday, February 20, 2013 - Updated: 8:29 AM

By PETE KLEIN

Express News Staff

INDIAN LAKE - The Indian Lake Town Board passed two resolutions concerning gun control when it met Monday, Feb. 11, both inspired by the New York Secure Ammunition and Firearms Enforcement Act of 2013 recently signed into law.

One resolution, sponsored by the Indian Lake / Blue Mountain Fish and Game Association, is a copy of a resolution passed by the Ulster County Legislature. It calls upon the NYS Legislature to repeal “any legislation, including the sections within the NY SAFE Act, which infringe upon the right of the people to keep and bear arms.”

It includes 30 reasons why the board believes the law should be repealed and says, “the New York State Legislature should hold public hearings to address the issue of gun violence in a way that will produce meaningful results.”

This resolution passed 3-2. Supervisor Brian Wells, Councilwoman Jane Locke and Councilman John Rathbun voted yea. Councilwoman Sally Stanton and Councilman Jack Valentine voted nay.

The second resolution received unanimous support. It backs the New York State Sheriff’s Association’s position on the SAFE Act. The sheriff’s association agrees with six provisions of the new law but feels the rest should be modified, as reported in last week’s issue.

The primary concerns are the SAFE Act might be a violation of the Second Amendment to the Bill of Rights and that the act was passed too quickly and without public input.

Two other concerns were expressed. One has to do with the ban on possessing magazines holding more than seven rounds of ammunition and the other is concern that the SAFE Act might ban historic guns.

The seven-round limit refers to detachable clips used with semi-automatic rifles; it does not include the tubular magazines found on many bolt action and lever action rifles.

Wells said Assessor Meade Hutchins has done some checking on the legal status of the Chain Lakes Road, and there do appear to be town records that show it as a town road extending to the confluence of the Cedar River with the Hudson River for as far back as the 1800s.

If this can be proven in court, it may be all that is needed to keep the road open to motorized traffic regardless of any future land use classification and regardless of Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers regulations.

Wells was directed to send a letter to Assemblyman Marc Butler (R-Newport) asking for his help in restoring school aid to Hamilton County schools that is targeted to be cut in the governor’s proposed budget.

The letter warns, “If the Governor is truly serious about New York State being a leader in education, these funds not only need to be put back in the budget, they need to be increased. It is time to get serious in Albany and do what is best for the taxpayers and the children of this state. Now is the time to look at unfunded mandates and flawed state aid formulas. The state touts the ‘Adirondacks’ as being unique, it is time to start treating it that way.”

Four bids ranging from $4,500 to over $23,000 were received to provide service and materials to take down the old emergency communications tower on Tower Hill and relocate the three antennas on it to the new cell tower. All were accepted for further review.

The Indian Lake Town Board will next meet Monday, March 11, starting at 7 p.m. in Town Hall.

     

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