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The Way Things Were - 06/26/13 By Anne Weaver

Wednesday, June 26, 2013 - Updated: 5:20 PM

ABOUT THE WEEK OF JUNE 26, 1964, a light rainfall broke a weeklong dry spell that found temperatures, but high humidity, in the mid-80s for several days in a row. Cloudy skies with cooler temperatures but high humidity greeted early risers mid-week.

In the afternoon the skies darkened and light showers fell throughout the Central Adirondacks. The predicted thunder and lightning never showed up. The woods were becoming extremely dry and many lawns were showing brown from the hot sun of the past week.

Minors under age 16 would be admitted to Vernon Downs during the general period of summer vacation, June 19 to Sept. 8, if accompanied by a parent or guardian.

New York state produced 30 percent of the nation's total maple syrup output in 1962.

At INLET, the management of the Enchanted Forest, popular tourist attraction in the Central Adirondack community, announced the line-up of its 1964 special summer show. In keeping with its tradition of featuring big name talent such as the Great Wallendas, who had performed there for the past two seasons, the headliner in 1964 would be Tarzan.

While releasing details of its show, Manager Joe Uzdavinis stated, "It was a difficult task to find an outstanding act as well as a recognizable name to follow the Great Wallendas, but we feel, after searching most of the winter for acts, we have come up with a wonderful star."

"As a matter of fact, Karl Wallenda, famed leader of the high wire family, assisted us in signing Tarzan. They performed together in two of the top Shriner circuses in the country, Detroit and Cleveland, in January." Young Joe Zerbini, a native of France, is the latest successor to the Tarzan title.

MGM was planning a new series of movies in which Zerbini was expected to star. He had already appeared in the American Broadcasting Company's TV show "Hollywood Palace." He was the first animal trainer to portray Tarzan.

Working with animals was not strange to Zerbini as he started training elephants at age 8. His father owned a French circus and it was natural that he learned to perform. A few years later lions drew his interest and he had earned the reputation of being Europe's outstanding animal trainer.

One of the features of his act found him putting his head inside a lion's mouth while in a cage with five other lions. Two young cubs and a pet chimp completed his ménage.

Rounding out the show would be Mimi, another French star, who would perform on the trapeze; and Bumpsy, the original "Sad Sack" clown. The circus show would start June 28 and continue with daily performances until Aug. 23.

Word had been received of the death of Mrs. Sylvia Schoelz, in Hamilton, Saturday, June 20. Mrs. Schoelz, with her husband Oswald Schoelz, owned and operated the Hotel Kenmore, 4th Lake, Old Forge, for more than 35 years.

She was active in the hotel operation and left with her husband in 1953 when they sold the hotel to Mr. and Mrs. Richard McCarley. Besides her husband she left a son, George, of Hamilton; and a daughter in New Jersey.

There would be a big Adirondack Hootenanny and Folk Festival at McCauley Mountain near Old Forge. The show would feature the famed folk-singing trio The Wingate Singers as well as The Newport Trio, Bill Wilson and Jim Mote.

All had been performing in New York state and New England for the past year and had been drawing overflow crowds to similar hootenannies and folk festivals. If successful, this show would be followed with additional concerts throughout the summer.

Camp Gorham, located on Darts Lake near Big Moose, would have 20 horses for the summer for its Circle Y Ranch Camp unit. Weldon B. Hester, a director of camping for the YMCA of Rochester and Monroe County, had just completed rental arrangements with Jack Frost of Honoyo to supply the mounts for the 1964 season.

Hester reported the ranch camp had been extended in 1964 to accept 32 boys ages 11 to 17 per period. Twenty-four was the 1963 capacity. Each two boys would have their own horse, which they would care for as well as ride. The camp unit would be led by foreman Terry Williams of Honeoyo, two wranglers and four counselors.

The ranch camp unit was part of the YMCA's new 11,000-acre Camp Gorham. It opened the previous summer, an outgrowth of the Y's Capital Funds Campaign of 1961. In addition to the big horse barn, the ranch had a 114-foot bunkhouse, a 50-foot training circle and a 100- by 200-foot corral. There were 28 miles of riding trails on the camp property and hundreds more throughout the Adirondack State Forest Preserve.

The camp taught western-style riding to those who knew nothing about horses as well as those with some experience. Boys learned to ride bareback and with western saddles. Overnight trips were made to Raquette Lake and Rondaxe Lake. One of the favorite sports was broom polo, with exhibitions at the annual camp rodeo in August.

The Gaiety Theatre was advertising the following movies: Sidney Poitier in "Lilies of the Field" with Lilia Skala and Stanley Adams; Yul Brynner, George Chakiris and Shirley Anne Field in "King of the Sun;" Frank Sinatra, Anita Ekberg, Dean Martin and Ursula Andress in "4 For Texas;" and "Act One" with George Hamilton, Jason Robards Jr., Jack Klugman and Eli Wallach.

At LAKE PLEASANT, Army Pfc Robert N. Brooks, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs. Milton W. Brooks, Speculator, and other members of the 25th Division 35th Infantry, were participating in Exercise HIGH TOP IL, a five-week field training maneuver which began early in February.

The men of the division moved from the Island of Oahu to the rugged lava beds of the volcano Mauna Lau on the Island of Hawaii for the live fire and combined arms training exercises. Brooks was a cook in Company B, 1st Battalion, of the infantry at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. He entered the Army in December of 1961. His wife, Ethel, lived in Wahiawa, Oahu, Hawaii.

     

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